Pedro Pimentel
B4ea13da36f806cb169f412c397be36a?d=retro
Ranked 63 in Phase 1 with 49 unique views, 14 counted upvotes and 15 counted downvotes

Building your Testing Mindset with Ruby

Have you ever wondered why the word "should" is so important on BDD? Or which context tools like TestUnit, RSpec, Cucumber and Selenium were created? Or even why we use the "given, when, then" format on Cucumber?

On this talk, with plentiful of code, you will learn/understand the motivation behind the most common tools / techniques for testing in the Ruby world.

Furthermore, knowing how to use your toolset's API is not even considered a minimum requirement nowadays. Some might dare to dive on their toolset source-code to understand their internals and reason about their decisions but even fewer dare to understand why and in which circumstances those tools were created. Even though this talk's code examples are in Ruby you will realize the general principle is the same, no matter your technology of choice.


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  • The proposal author responded 8 months ago

    Hi Max,

    Thanks for your feedback. I have to agree with you on being a very generic proposal. Maybe I didn't make clear that even by showing code, I won't be diving into any technicalities. Code will be a supporting material to present basic concepts that led to the creation of tools/techniques like unit testing, BDD, cucumber and selenium to name a few.

    You might not learn anything new, technically speaking, from this talk but you will have a deeper understanding on how certain things were designed/thought.

    For example, one of my favorites is the reasoning behind the word "should" being used in RSpec. So many other words you could possibly choose like ensure, enforce, verify, check but "should" was the one, following principles of NLP (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neuro-linguistic_programming), which says that if your code read well, you don't need to document that much. Added to that the fact the "should" is one word that triggers critical thinking, making you question things, know as "begging the question" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Begging_the_question).

    But if you ask me, the biggest lesson from this talk (which I purposely didn't mention on this proposal) is that at the end of the day, "test code" is "code". Unfortunately I cannot write it here, otherwise will be a "spoiler". ;)

  • B472b6e2dfd982ec3995cf4471b4c1e4?d=retro Max Gorin suggested 8 months ago

    On this talk, with plentiful of code, you will learn/understand the motivation behind the most common tools / techniques for testing in the Ruby world.

    Honestly, this doesn't make me excited, as I still can't imagine what would be new things I'd learn about motivation behind those. Could you elaborate?

    About diving into the source code to understand the internals - nothing new here either. All in all, too generic a proposal.