Bruno Aguirre
2bf6a27deb550fa388da2c99c8abde12?d=retro
Ranked 68 in Phase 1 with 59 unique views, 11 counted upvotes and 13 counted downvotes

The Web of tomorrow

The web is changing and new changes are coming.

Description

How will the new RFCs will affect the web as we know it? What technologies will raise again? Is Ruby prepared for this changes? Are we?

I want to answer these questions and talk about new web technologies and how we need to change to adapt to this upcoming era.

The web is changing fast and we as Ruby developers need to be in the cutting edge.

From web sockets to WebRTC. From distributed to decentralised.

Are you ready to change the web as we know it?

Agenda

  1. How does getUserMedia works.
  2. How to store camera information in the backend.
  3. How does PeerConnection works.
  4. Ruby's task in the connection
  5. DataChannel
  6. WebRTC Social Impact

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Suggestions

  • The proposal author responded 8 months ago

    WebRTC specifically attempts to be an standard for communication within browsers but that just because both peers are webRTC-capable. So having a backend webRTC capable provides another level of communication and that's the main idea in the talk. Learn all the backend aspects that are necessary to make a large scale system... not just the call/answer demo.

    Thank you for your suggestions. I'll add an outline of the talk.

    Cheers.

  • 5976001c9ebf095c4988855a4e102de5?d=retro Clemens Kofler suggested 8 months ago

    The topic of the talk is certainly interesting: If we finally manage to get rid of old technology (think IE < 10, Flash and the like), the "web as we know it" will probably gradually disappear.

    However, I'm not clear how Ruby fits into the title of the talk: Ruby is a server-side (backend) language and unless efforts like Google's NaCl catch on quickly and globally, I don't see that this will change in the near future. And most, if not all, of the main web technology RFCs are language agnostic: One can use them with Ruby or whichever other language.

    That being said, I can imagine a talk without (forced) references to Ruby that focuses entirely on aspects of the future web. You would need to outline some of these aspects in your proposal, though, so I (and others) can determine whether or not they are interesting enough for a full talk.